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No holiday in Iceland is complete without a soak in the geothermal, mineral rich waters of the Blue Lagoon, or the Sky Lagoon if you want a more off the beaten track experience. Bathing in warm pools is an Iceland tradition that stretches back centuries, and has been a cornerstone of Icelandic culture for the purposes of healing, relaxing, socialising and exercising.

With Not In The Guidebooks, you can combine a serene day at the Blue Lagoon with any number of exciting activities like whale watching off the coast of Iceland, witnessing the magic of the northern lights, hiking on glaciers, exploring ice caves, and much more.

And with transfers and tickets completely taken care of, all you need to do is relax and float without a worry in the therapeutic, warm waters of the Blue Lagoon, drinking in the otherworldly views of the surrounding lava fields.

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Spa Soaking in Geothermal Pools

There are few places on earth that you can sit with a beer in hand, looking out over rocky lava fields or the crashing waves of the Atlantic, submerged in beautifully warm water that’s heated by the forces of the earth, but it’s something you can experience on a holiday in Iceland.

Whether you pick the Blue Lagoon or the Sky Lagoon, you’re guaranteed a relaxing, memorable experience that is unique to Icelandic culture. Thanks to the readily available supply of geothermal energy that comes about due to the island’s position on the mid-Atlantic Ridge, Icelanders have been making use of naturally warm springs and rivers for centuries.

What is the Blue Lagoon?

The Blue Lagoon, contrary to what many people believe, is not actually an entirely natural wonder. It is, in fact, formed by the runoff from a nearby geothermal power plant that was opened in 1976, designed to harness the pressurised hot water deep in the earth’s crust to drive steam turbines.

Whilst the idea of swimming in the waste water from a power plant might seem a touch scary, it’s actually incredibly clean and refreshes in its entirety every 48 hours. In fact, it refreshes itself so often that there is no need for any chemicals at all to keep it clean. Throw in the fact that it’s packed with natural minerals that are great for the skin, and it didn’t take long for Icelanders to realise that this is a great place to bathe.

The first public facilities opened in 1987, growing to the point that they welcomed a staggering 1.3 million visitors in 2017. To give you a little perspective on how popular that makes it, that’s more than three times the entire population of Iceland.

What time is the Blue Lagoon open?

The nature of the seasons in Iceland means that you can experience the Blue Lagoon in a variety of different settings. But the constant temperature of 37-40 degrees centigrade means that it’s a comfortable experience year-round, with different quirks only adding to the relaxing float in the lagoon.

blue lagoon in daytime

In the months of November and December the lagoon is open from 09:00-20:00, and from 09:00-21:00 in January through to May. Going on these dates mean you can enjoy the surreal feeling of floating outside in beautifully warm waters, whilst enjoying the clod, crisp air and the view of snow-dusted lava fields around you.

The lagoon is also open from 08:00-21:00 in September and October, so if you stay late from any time from October through to February, and you’re incredibly lucky, you might even catch a glimpse of the northern lights.

In June the lagoon is open from 08:00-22:00, and in July through to August you can stay from 08:00-23:00. This means you can enjoy light, late nights, it’s not often you get to stay in a geothermal lagoon under the sun until almost midnight.

Why choose Not In The Guidebooks?

We’re passionate about helping people find the most amazing experiences on their travels, through meeting local people, exploring new places, and discovering alternative activities that make holidays special. We do this by carefully selecting partners in countries around the world who are experts in their local area, sourcing interesting people who can guide you through immersive experiences.

We’ve got local partners all across Iceland, from the wild north coast to the country’s urban centre – Reykjavik. Choosing a Not In The Guidebooks experience in Iceland means you don’t have to choose between a wildlife or an activity-filled break, you can get the best of both worlds with a unique trip.

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